Love is in the A.Ir

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I love RPGs. I really do. This is largely because, just like why I like to read, I play video games primarily to escape the excruciating monotony of my otherwise drab existence. And part of the particular allure for RPGs is making the character my own through the choices I make. So for me the trend of adding romantic options to RPGs is a great one. Because for a guy who likes to customise every aspect of his characters it upsets me that I can’t also decide the type of woman (or man – my fictional heroes are progressively liberal) they’re attracted too.

page 12 Videogame PhotographyIn my opinion the Dragon Age franchise is the best example of this, as a game that centres very much around a world that reacts to your morally ambiguous decisions, it would be slightly disappointing if romance in Thedas was any less complex.

It mercifully does the game justice, with your chances at persuading other characters to share your tent depending largely on how much they approve of characters action. Which in theory adds to the replayability of the game, as if you decide to play the game a different way your booty call options shift respectively.

This however, for me, falls down. Because instead of hooking up with whoever best fits my character, I find myself (rather embarrassingly) making choices to impress whichever of my party I’ve decided I want knock my armoured boots with. Something I think my string of past flings probably wish I emulated in real life.

But hey, this way I have more time to play video games.

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About Author

Elliott Campbell is former Media Officer at the University of Bath (2014/15) and former Deputy Editor-in-Chief at bathimpact (2012/13). He writes about gaming and popular culture.

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