BUNCS talk video games

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Representing the University of Bath at a national level is an incredible achievement for any student. While the University loves to boast about its sporting achievements, it rarely publicises society achievements. Hopefully The Video Game society (BUNCS) will help buck that trend!

“The National University eSports League” provides a National competition for League of Legends with over 200 active teams that represent over 70% of UK Universities.

On the 22 February “no bads allowed”, captained by Harry Hartley (HJH), claimed 12th place and qualified for the last spot in the Super 8 promotion to compete against one of the 4 bottom seeds in the Super 8 on the 1 March. Initially it looked quite bleak as they faced the might of the “Cambridge Dongers”. This was a team that had proved themselves in LAN tournaments’ such as the “4 Nations” but had never looked the same since the departure of their mid-laner.

The first game saw Bath gamble with a “protect the marksmen” composition, designed to create room for Oscar Tan (ForeverBeyond) to decimate the Cambridge side. In a tense game Bath managed to pull out a small lead before catching their opponents’ off-guard by taking a crucial objective, that proved to be decisive as they cruised home after 35 minutes.

Though Cambridge were down, they were far from out, after switching around roles they then proceeded to pick a questionable composition based on picking off targets with mages. Bath stuck to their guns but struggled to keep up with the intensity of the Cambridge players. In a pro-longed game the “Dongers” managed to find the crucial targets, squaring the series up at 1 -1.

Chris interviews Harry Hartley before the Best of the South West

Chris interviews Harry Hartley before the Best of the South West

In the deciding match, “no bads allowed” brought their secret weapon. Kristoffer Thuesen (Krisso) stepped into the line-up and with his wealth of experience playing in international tournaments led from the front and Bath switched to a more balanced composition that favoured all-round team play. Cambridge took a page out of Bath’s book opting for a “protect the marksmen” style. The two teams’ traded equal blows as both searched for an opening, unfortunately it was Cambridge that found the first weakness, splitting open Bath’s defence in one manoeuvre. However Bath weathered the storm to hit their item thresholds before managing to slowly push the “Dongers” back. With their composition faltering the “Dongers” tried a last ditch attempt to reclaim their Super 8 position, but Krisso’s positioning helped to tear the “Dongers” apart and close the game after 50 intense minutes.

After the game, “GGWP” (Good game, well played) filled the chat, and the teams talked for long after the match ended. There were no “ego-trips” but recognition at the level of play and analysis of what could have been.

Finishing in this manner revealed the true nature of eSports (and sports too). That at the end of it all, it’s just a game!

To find out about BUNCS, The Video Gaming Society, and the variety of competitive and casual games we play, join our Facebook group! https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/buncs/?fref=ts

Photo credits: Christopher Harvey

 

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About Author

Christopher Harvey was a Civil Engineering student and Social Secretary of the BUNCS - The Video Game Society at the University of Bath. He writes about gaming.

1 Comment

  1. Wow this was a interesting read. I have always been a fan of gaming and its nice to see people like you sharing content thats related to gaming. Thanks 🙂

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